StudyMRCOG – READ, UPDATE & IMPROVE

StudyMRCOG is putting more initiative to access all the latest news in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology in just one single click. We believe that all the students shall be up to date on the changed happening at the present and about to come on future. These data help us to improve ourselves It sounds daunting, but improvements don’t have to be huge, they can be really small which incrementally leads to huge change. Think improving just 1% each day and build upon that every single day.

StudyMRCOG – READ, UPDATE & IMPROVE

StudyMRCOG is putting more initiative to access all the latest news in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology in just one single click. We believe that all the students shall be up to date on the changed happening at the present and about to come on future. These data help us to improve ourselves It sounds daunting, but improvements don’t have to be huge, they can be really small which incrementally leads to huge change. Think improving just 1% each day and build upon that every single day.

Never Stop Learning

Whether that is reading a summary or listening to a podcast or completing a quiz. This is the reason StudyMRCOG is giving hands full of options for the students who like to achieve their career goals and chase their dreams.

Fraudulent WhatsApp messages to exam candidates

The College has been made aware of fraudulent WhatsApp messages sent to an exam candidate following an exchange via a Facebook page.
The message claims that, in light of the disruption to our exams caused by the pandemic, the College has decided to grant full membership to all candidates who have passed the theoretical parts of our exam (Part 1 and Part 2 MRCOG) and who have practical experience. The email then asks candidates who meet these criteria to email their CV and results for the Part 1 and Part 2 exams to a specified email address which contains the word ‘MRCOG’.

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New research suggests caffeine raises stillbirth risk in pregnancy

Scientists from Tommy’s Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre at the University of Manchester have studied more than 1,000 mothers across 41 UK hospitals between 2014 and 2016.
They combined information typically used to measure stillbirth risk with an interviewer-led questionnaire about mothers’ consumption of various caffeinated drinks, as well as other risk factors like alcohol and cigarettes that have confused previous studies, to see if and when stillbirth may have been linked to caffeine.

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Application for EBCOG Part 1 exam is open Now – Please Register immediately

The exam consists of 2 parts.
Part 1 is a knowledge based exam based on a computer based test and part 2 is an OSCE. There is also an optional prep course for each exam.
The number of seats are limited. To guarantee a seat early reservation is recommended.
If you have any specific exam questions please contact our exam secretariat Mr Alexandros Peristeropoulos at: [email protected]

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EBCOG Fellowship Exam

The exam consists of 2 parts.
Part 1 is a knowledge based exam based on a computer based test and part 2 is an OSCE. There is also an optional prep course for each exam.
The number of seats are limited. To guarantee a seat early reservation is recommended.
If you have any specific exam questions please contact our exam secretariat Mr Alexandros Peristeropoulos at: [email protected]
Subscribe at bottom of page for updates regarding our exam activities. Also check out the EBCOG facebook (@ebcogorg) or twitter account (@ebcog_org) for updates, pictures and comments regarding our exams.

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Diet and lifestyle during pregnancy linked to modifications in infants’ DNA

A new study has shown pregnant women with obesity could reduce the health risks for their infants through improved diet and more physical activity.
Research published in the journal PLOS Medicine investigates the impact of high glucose in mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and changes to infants DNA.

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Safe pregnancy is possible for women with interstitial lung disease

A new study shows that women with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to autoimmune disease may not need to terminate their pregnancies—despite the increased risk of adverse outcomes—provided they have close monitoring from their team of multidisciplinary physicians before, during and after pregnancy. Results of the research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting (ABSTRACT #1446).

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Postponement of Part 3 MRCOG exam

The College has taken the extremely difficult decision to postpone the November Part 3 MRCOG exams until further notice following recent news and research suggesting that the COVID-19 infection rate is increasing exponentially in many parts of the country.
In reaching this decision, the Officers and RCOG Executive had extensive discussions considering the risks of proceeding with the exam.

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Clinical Presentation of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Pregnant and Recently Pregnant People

OBJECTIVE:
To describe the clinical presentation, symptomology, and disease course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy.
METHODS:
The PRIORITY (Pregnancy CoRonavIrus Outcomes RegIsTrY) study is an ongoing nationwide prospective cohort study of people in the United States who are pregnant or up to 6 weeks postpregnancy with known or suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection.

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Mothers pass on allergies to offspring, preclinical study shows

Mothers can pass allergies to offspring while they are developing in the womb, researchers from the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital (KKH) and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore reported this week in the journal Science.
The study, which employed an animal model conducted according to the National Advisory Committee for Laboratory Animal Research (NACLAR) guidelines, shows that the key antibody responsible for triggering allergic reactions, immunoglobulin E (IgE), can cross the placenta and enter the fetus.

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Booking Open for MRCOG Part 2

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Booking Open for MRCOG Part 1

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Doctors suggest ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients

A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues have studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition. The results of the work were published in The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine.

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FCPS II – Notification

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New research bolsters link between prenatal smoking and impaired lung development

Babies born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy are more likely to suffer from impaired lung development. They are also more susceptible to developing lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new research article published in the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology. The article has been chosen as an APSselect article for October.

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Flu vaccination for pregnant women essential this winter, say professional bodies

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and Royal College of Midwives (RCM) are urging all pregnant women to take up the offer of a free flu vaccination this winter to protect themselves and their baby from complications caused by the flu virus.
For the majority of people, flu is usually a self-limiting disease with a relatively quick recovery time. However, developing flu during pregnancy can be serious for a small number of women and their babies. This is because pregnancy can alter how your body handles viral infections, such as flu.

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RCPI launch new online Gateway to Communication course

The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) has just launched a new online course to help promote better communication skills for doctors. The Gateway to Communication course has been developed in association with the College of Anaesthesiologists of Ireland, the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, the Irish College of General Practitioners, the HSE Open Disclosure Programme, and the HSE National Healthcare Communication Programme.
This innovative new course will be delivered online and allows doctors in the Irish healthcare service to complete it at a time that suits them.

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Researchers zero in on genetic connection to postpartum hemorrhage

Researchers have identified genetic mutations that appear to protect women from severe bleeding after childbirth, a leading cause of maternal death. A preliminary study of the findings is being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2020 annual meeting.
DNA, which carries genetic information in cells, contain biological instructions. A genetic mutation, which is a permanent change in the DNA, can be beneficial, decreasing a person’s risk for a disease or condition, or harmful, increasing that risk.

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Vitamin D exposure in utero might minimize high blood pressure risk for children born to mothers with preeclampsia

Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy—but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
The findings, based on an analysis of data on 754 mother-child pairs in Massachusetts, suggest that higher vitamin D levels in pregnancy may help protect children born to preeclamptic women from developing high blood pressure.

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Fertility rates lower in women with inflammatory bowel disease

(HealthDay)—Fertility is lower in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis.
Emma Druvefors, from County Hospital Ryhov in Jönköping, Sweden, and colleagues used the Swedish National Patient Register to identify 27,331 women with IBD (aged 15 to 44 years in 1964 to 2014) to assess differences in fertility compared to 131,892 matched individuals without IBD.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care

Version 3.1: Published Friday 31 July 2020 – guidance for healthcare professionals on coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care, published by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Royal College of Midwives, Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare and the British Society of Abortion Care Providers.

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Part 2 MRCOG: exam calendar and fees

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Targeted intervention to reduce severe tearing in childbirth ‘promising’, studies reveal

Two new evaluation papers exploring the impact of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ and Royal College of Midwives’ OASI Care Bundle have been published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and BMJ Open
Third- or fourth-degree perineal tears, also known as an obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI), can occur in 6 out of 100 births (6%) for first-time mothers and less than 2 in 100 births (2%) of births for women who have had a vaginal birth before. These injuries can have severe, life-long implications for a woman’s mental and physical health. 

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NAMS updates guidance for genitourinary syndrome of menopause

(HealthDay)—In a position statement from the North American Menopause Society (NAMS), published in the September issue of Menopause, updated recommendations are presented for the treatment of genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM).
Stephanie S. Faubion, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, and colleagues reviewed the evidence on vaginal hormone therapies and other management options for GSM. Recommendations were updated and expanded based on current evidence.

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Healthy diet and exercise during pregnancy could lead to healthier children, study finds

New research shows improving the lifestyle of women with obesity during pregnancy could mean long-term cardiovascular benefits for their children.
The study, led by King’s College London and supported by the British Heart Foundation and Tommy’s charity, examined how an antenatal diet and physical activity intervention in pregnant women with obesity could positively influence the health of the women and their children three years after giving birth.

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MRCPI – Examination Calender

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Women’s wellness: Three tips for gynecologic cancer awareness

Gynecologic cancers start in a woman’s reproductive organs. The five main types are cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancer. Every five minutes, a woman is diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer, according to the Foundation for Women’s Cancer. And of the estimated 90,000 women in the U.S. who are diagnosed, more than 33,000 will die from these diseases.

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Study identifies how infection by Zika virus during pregnancy can affect the fetal brain

Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause severe abnormalities in the fetus, including malformations such as microcephaly. In a small proportion of cases, the disease may lead to miscarriage and perinatal death.A network of more than 30 Brazilian researchers set out to find the causes of these problems with the support of FAPESP and obtained important results after half a decade of hard work.

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Methylation profiles of imprinted genes are distinct between mature ovarian teratoma, complete hydatidiform mole, and extragonadal mature teratoma

Mature ovarian teratoma is considered to be a parthenogenetic tumor that arises from a single oocyte/ovum. Conversely, complete hydatidiform mole (CHM) is androgenetic in origin: classic CHM arises from a single or two sperm. Since mature ovarian teratoma and CHM have only maternal and paternal genomes, respectively, their genome imprinting is theoretically reverse, but this has yet to be investigated.

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CPSP – FCPS OBG Part 2 – Important Announcement

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Balanced diet while breastfeeding helps in post-delivery weight loss

NAGPUR: Most of us know that breast milk helps to keep the baby healthy by providing all the important nutrients that the child requires in the proper quantities. Breastfeeding also has its benefits for mothers. Apart from saving new mothers from various types of cancer, diabetes and hypertension, it helps burn calories thereby helping in post-partum weight loss, said dietitian Malvika Fulwan.

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Benefits of inhaled nitric oxide therapy for pregnant patients with COVID-19

Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) can be a valuable adjunct respiratory therapy for pregnant women with severe and critical COVID-19, a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found. The delivery of the therapeutic gas to six COVID-19 pregnant patients admitted to MGH, as described in a paper in Obstetrics & Gynecology, resulted in a rapid and sustained improvement in cardiopulmonary function and decreased inflammation.

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Examination Schedule

The College of Physicians & Surgeons Pakistan has decided to conduct theory examination of FCPS – I, FCPS – II (major and other subjects), Intermediate Module and IMM during the year 2020 & 2021 as per program given below.

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FCPS-II (Major Subjects) September 2020 Session
Issue Date : August 26, 2020

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Obstetrics and Gynaecology Part II Written

About MRCPI Obstetrics and Gynaecology Part II Written

The MRCPI Obstetrics and Gynaecology Part II Written examination consists of one exam paper with 100 Single Best Answer questions.
You have three hours to complete the exam.
Single Best Answer questions consist of a ‘vignette’ (clinical scenario) followed by five possible answers. You must select the single best answer.
There is no negative marking and questions are equally weighted so we advise you to attempt all questions.

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Obesity and Obstetrics / Obesity and Gynaecology

Dr Tahir Mahmood, past president of EBCOG, has been working with two eminent supporters of EBCOG, Sir Sabaratnam Arulkumaran and Prof Frank Chervenak, for the publication of new edition of two volumes on obesity and obstetrics/gynaecology.
Obesity and Obstetrics, Second Edition,brings together experts to examine the issues and challenges of obesity and obstetrics, also discussing how obesity affects fertility, reproduction and pregnancy.

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EBCOG

EBCOG Fellowship exam

The exam consists of 2 parts.
Part 1 is a knowledge based exam based on a computer based test and part 2 is an OSCE. There is also an optional prep course for each exam.
​The number of seats are limited. To guarantee a seat early reservation is recommended.
If you have any specific exam questions please contact our exam secretariat Mr Alexandros Peristeropoulos at: [email protected]

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Part 1 MRCOG: Exam Calendar and Fees

Dates, venues and fees for the Part 1 MRCOG exam

Exam dates

  • Monday 28 September
  • January 2021 – date TBC

Exam: Monday 28 September 2020

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Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19)

Summary of Key Updates (July 28, 2020)

Below is a summary of recent critical updates to this Practice Advisory.
Precautions for Health Care Personnel: Personal Protective Equipment has been updated to include information on the extended use of N95 masks.

General Information Regarding Pregnant Individuals and COVID-19

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) have developed an algorithm to aid practitioners in assessing and managing pregnant women with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. View the algorithm (Spanish version).

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Non-hormonal Treatment for Menopausal Symptoms Offers Hope of Relief

A non-hormonal therapy to treat hot flashes and other symptoms associated with menopause was found to be effective in a recent clinical trial, according to a published study by a team of researchers including faculty from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
Fezolinetant, an oral, non-hormone therapy in clinical development, offers relief for hot flashes and night sweats, which are the most common menopause-associated symptoms for which women seek treatment. About 80 percent of American women experience these symptoms.

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Covid-19 vaccine tracker, August 2: Clinical trials of Russian vaccine completed

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine tracker update: Russia’s health minister was quoted in the news reports as saying that a mass vaccination programme, presumably using this vaccine, would be launched in Russia in October and that doctors and teachers would be among the first groups to be vaccinated.
A potential novel Coronavirus vaccine being developed by Moscow’s Gamaleya Institute had completed clinical trials, and ‘paperwork’ for its ‘registration’ with the country’s regulatory body was underway, Russian media reported on Saturday.

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Are there really fewer premature babies in lockdown? We’re likely clutching at straws

Amid the horrific stories of coronavirus deaths and disease around the world, researchers have reported a ray of light.
Almost simultaneously, two independent groups in Europe noticed their neonatal intensive care units seemed quieter during the pandemic.
Was this a coincidence? Or were there actually fewer babies born prematurely who needed intensive care? And if fewer premature babies were being born, why?

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Part 3 MRCOG Exam

In response to the ongoing global pandemic, the RCOG has taken the difficult decision to run the Part 3 exam in the UK only for solely UK trainees.  To allow for social distancing requirements it will be run from the 02 – 05 November 2020.
This decision has been made in order to protect the health of our candidates, examiners and staff as we continue to follow government guidelines and respond to the continued COVID-19 restrictions both in the UK and overseas.

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MTP Allowed for 28-week Foetus with Anomalies: Bombay High Court

MUMBAI: The Bombay high court permitted a married woman to terminate her 28- week pregnancy with multiple foetal congenital anomalies. The court also directed the state to take the child into its care, if born alive.
On June 30, HC had permitted the termination and directed the couple to look after child, if born alive. The court called for a report from a JJ Hospital medical board, which confirmed the severe malformations. The medical board noted the “substantial risk of serious physical handicap and very high morbidity and mortality”, and advised termination of pregnancy, if court permits.

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New Review on Management of Osteoporosis in Premenopausal Women

Osteoporosis, a disease which leads to bone fragility and an increased risk of fractures, is very common among postmenopausal women, affecting around one in three over the age of 50 worldwide. However, as osteoporosis and related fragility fractures are rare in younger women, there is far less research, and consequently a lack of consensus and guidance on its diagnosis and management in this population group.

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Simple twist of DNA determines fate of placenta

The development of the mammalian placenta depends upon an unusual twist that separates DNA’s classic double helix into a single-stranded form, Yale researchers report July 15 in the journal Nature.
The Yale team also identified the molecular regulator that acts upon this single strand to accelerate or stop placental development, a discovery with implications not only for diseases of pregnancy but also for understanding how cancer tumors proliferate.

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New reliable method for treating male sterility

Infertility affects one in seven men of reproductive age worldwide. One idea for treating male sterility is spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) therapy. In this approach, sperm stem cells in the testis are transferred to a test tube, cultured, and nudged into becoming fully-fledged sperm.
However, a key bottleneck has been identifying just the right conditions to get human SSCs to grow in the lab. There have been many attempts, but in most reported cases it was not clear whether the cells being cultured were actually SSCs, and no previously published method is routinely used.

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COVID-19 Can be Transmitted in the Womb, Study Reports

A baby girl in Texas—born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19—is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, reports The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases.
The findings “suggest in utero transmission” of COVID-19 from an infected mother to her infant, according to the case report by Julide Sisman, MD, and colleagues of The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

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RCPI Delivers its First Examinations Through Remote Invigilation

This week 470 doctors in 16 countries took RCPI written computer-based examinations through remote invigilation. That means that they were able to take the examination in their own home or place of work and were not required to travel to an examination centre.
RCPI is the first postgraduate medical college in Ireland or the UK to deliver a computer-based exam with such a large scale number via a remote invigilation platform. The changes were introduced by RCPI to enable doctors to sit their membership examinations safely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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New Exams IT system

The RCOG is launching the first phase of our new Exams IT System to support our MRCOG and DRCOG exams from September 2020. This will see us transition our written exam provision (MRCOG Part 1 & 2 and DRCOG) from a paper-based to a computer-based format.
The new system will make the exams process secure, simple, transparent and fit for purpose in the 21st century. We have partnered with Pearson VUE to deliver an integrated digital solution that will support our exams function and processes, while delivering an excellent experience for candidates taking their exam.

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Updated advice for pregnant women who are working in the NHS and other work settings during the coronavirus outbreak

Pregnant women’s choices on whether they work in direct patient-facing roles during the coronavirus pandemic should be respected and supported by their employers, according to updated national guidance from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the Royal College of Midwives.Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection poses a risk to all members of the population, particularly to people with underlying conditions.

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RCOG/FSRH respond to new regulations on abortion care in Northern Ireland

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare welcomes new regulations on abortion care in Northern Ireland but warns they fall short of ensuring safe care during COVID-19.This follows a historic vote in Parliament in 2019 to decriminalise abortion care in Northern Ireland, which only allowed an abortion if a woman’s life was at risk or there was a danger of permanent and serious damage to her physical or mental health. Many women had to travel to England to access this essential area service.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and pregnancy

Version 10 of the coronavirus (COVID-19) infection in pregnancy guidance has been restructured to condense its content and ensure the evidence and rationale for advice is explicit. This version also contains new content on labour and birth for women who are asymptomatic of COVID-19, updates to advice for women with clinical deterioration, reference to the new testing frameworks and further advice regarding prevention of venous-thromboembolism.

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Assisted Vaginal Birth (Green-top Guideline No. 26)

This guideline provides evidence-based information on the use of forceps and vacuum extractor for both rotational and non-rotational operative vaginal deliveries.This update was undertaken as part of the regular updates to Green-top Guidelines as outlined in our document Developing a Green-top Guideline: Guidance for developers  and prior to the emergence of the new COVID-19 coronavirus. Please note that the information provided in this update will be considered for update 3 years after publication, with an intermediate assessment of the need to update 2 years after publication.

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Separating Mothers with COVID-19 From Their Newborns Does More Harm Than Good

In several countries pregnant women confirmed or suspected to have COVID-19 are being required to have cesarean sections or be separated from their newborn babies to restrict COVID-19 transmission.
Such measures may help health services better manage COVID-19 caseloads, but what are the consequences, and how do these practices compare with evidence-based global recommendations for maternity care during the pandemic?

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Coronavirus (COVID-19), Pregnancy and Women’s Health

The RCOG is committed to supporting the delivery of high-quality women’s healthcare in the context of COVID-19. We have developed a range of resources to inform and support healthcare professionals and the general public during the pandemic.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection and Pregnancy

Version 10.1: updated 19 June 2020. Guidance for healthcare professionals on coronavirus (COVID-19) infection in pregnancy, published by the RCOG, Royal College of Midwives, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, Public Health England and Public Health Scotland.

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